WAAC

 

Profile

Founded in 2009, WE ARE ALL COLLAGE (WAAC) is an innovative interdisciplinary architecture practice based in Portland, OR and Detroit, MI. WE ARE ALL COLLAGE explores indexicality, excess and the encyclopedic collage of contemporary experience through architecture, design and information culture. WAAC's current projects include The MODERN Architecture Genealogy, a digital humanities project that illustrates the evolution of architecture from 1850 to the present; The Listening Archive, an information-based music nonprofit and a forthcoming audio-video oral history collection at the Library of Congress; Pencils & A Pen, a photographic survey and installation series of 1980s Japanese novelty pencils; and an archeological curation facility north of Washington's Olympic National Park (shortlist, 2015).

Prior to establishing WE ARE ALL COLLAGE, Laura Foxman (LEED, NCARB) worked in New York City, Los Angeles and Mexico City on towers and cultural projects. Foxman studied the history of architecture at Wellesley College (B.A. in Architecture); and architecture design at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Princeton University (M.Arch). She has taught at The Pennsylvania State University, where she was a Stuckeman Fellow/Visiting Assistant Professor in Architecture; and at the Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies in New York City. Foxman is a licensed architect in the State of New York.

 

Mission

WE ARE ALL COLLAGE's mission is to innovate and offer timeless design. In order to achieve this, WAAC collages approaches, collaborates with a wide-range of creative experts across disciplines.  “We are all collage” means that the potential and opportunities for innovation through intersection is limitless.

 

News & Updates

AUG 26, 2016 Foxman will be taking about and reading from PENCILS & A PEN at Passages Bookshop in Portland, Oregon. Readings will be from Publication Studio collaborators and authors: Abra Ancliffe, Jon Raymond, Sam Lohmann, Diana Pembor and Laura Foxman. Festivities begin at 7 pm!

SUMMER/FALL 2016 The Modern Architecture Genealogy soft launch in the works...

MAY 2016 We Are All Collage is now in Detroit!

APR 2016 PENCILS & A PEN featured in Gray magazine's April/May issue. See spread here.

MAR 2016 PENCILS & A PEN is headed to Japan. The publication will be available at Tokyo's B&B (Books and Beer) and Hiroshima's READAN DEAT.

FEB 2016 Bucky, Biodomes, Eames and Me, an excerpt from Laura Foxman's interview with the designer and inventor Peter Jon Pearce on uncube.

JAN 2016 PENCILS & A PEN book party and micro installation at Publication Studio in Portland, Oregon. The micro installation will be up for days!

JAN 2016 / NOV 2015 PENCILS & A PEN installed at Publication Studio in Portland, Oregon on November 24. Visit Publication Studio! More details soon.

DEC 2015 Foxman is a Visiting Design Critic at Columbia University (NYC).

DEC 2015 Foxman is a Visiting Design Critic at Marywood University's School of Architecture (Scranton, PA).

NOV 19, 2015 PENCILS & A PEN book party and micro installation (in collaboration with Penn State architecture students) at CW Pencil Enterprise in New York City. Come celebrate!

NOV 2015 PENCILS & A PEN by Laura Foxman published by Publication Studio is now available! The book can be purchased at Alder & Co. (Portland), CW Pencil Enterprise (NYC), the New Museum (NYC) and Publication Studio. The title will be available at Canoe (Portland) and other stores in the coming weeks, months.

FALL 2015 The MODERN Architecture Genealogy soft launch in the works...

JUL 2015 Foxman partipates in the Center for Architecture's think tank event Edge Collaborations: Creative Partnership with Social Science organized by Tomas Rossant (AIANY President, Ennead Architects); and Roundtable Curators Melissa Marsh (Plastarc) and Evie Klein (Architect, Planner). A public forum on the topics covered will be held at the Center on August 6, 2015.

SUMMER / SPRING 2015 The Modern Architecture Genealogy soft launch in the works...

SPRING 2015 Chilean film editor Alvaro Jordan joins The Listening Archive team.

APR 10, 2015 Foxman takes part in the panel discussion Collaboarating and Communicating Across Disciplines, organized for Penn State's graduate geography student conference no) Boundaries, with Clio Andis (Geography, Penn State), Chris Fariss (Political Science, Penn State) and Elisabeth Root (Geography, University of Colorado).

APR 3-4 2015 Foxman presents Towards a Networked History: An Interdisciplinary Genealogical Approach Towards Expanding the History of Women in Architecture at Parsons The New School of Design as part of the Women, Architecture and Academia symposium organized by Peggy Deamer (Yale University), Brian McGrath (Parsons The New School of Design) and Ioanna Theocharopoulou (Parsons The New School of Design).

FEB 2015 WAAC makes a proposal to lead Athens-Clarke County's Public Art Master Planning process.

SPRING / WINTER 2015 Foxman teaches ARCH 132 studio at Penn State's Stuckeman School, Department of Architecture, where she is currently Career Development Assistant Professor/Fellow.

SPRING / WINTER 2015 Foxman & Penn State Researchers work to launch the online version of The Modern Architecture Genealogy. The development is supported in large part by a faculty grant from Penn State's College of Arts and Architecture.

SPRING / WINTER 2015 Book project is in the works. Graphic design by Neil Donnelly (NYC).

DEC 2014 Foxman is a Visiting Design Critic at SUNY Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning (Buffalo, NY).

DEC 2014 Foxman is a Visiting Design Critic at Marywood University's School of Architecture (Scranton, PA).

FALL 2014 Foxman teaches ARCH 121 and ARCH 131 studio at Penn State's Stuckeman School, Department of Architecture, where she is currently Career Development Assistant Professor/Fellow.

FALL 2014 Foxman & Penn State Researchers work to launch the online version of The Modern Architecture Genealogy. The development is supported in large part by a faculty grant from Penn State's College of Arts and Architecture.

FALL 2014 Book project is in the works...

SUMMER 2014 The Listening Archive (TLA) conducts its first NW-based audio-video interview in Oregon. TLA's LA-based team meets in Brentwood, CA.

SUMMER 2014 WAAC to LA, to SpaceX, for The Modern Architecture Genealogy.

SUMMER 2014 The Modern Architecture Genealogy development continues with Penn State Researchers.

SUMMER 2014 Book project is in the works. Photography by instrument photographer Michael Judge (Portland, OR).

APR 2014 Foxman presents Towards a Global Block System at ACSA's conference GLOBALIZING ARCHITECTURE / Flows and Disruptions in Miami Beach.

MAR 2014 Foxman presents WAAC's creative trajectories/processes in James Wines' drawing seminar at Penn State.

SPRING / WINTER 2014 Foxman teaches ARCH 122 and ARCH 332 studio at Penn State's Stuckeman School, Department of Architecture, where she is currently Career Development Assistant Professor/Fellow.

SPRING / WINTER 2014 Foxman & Penn State Researchers make major headway on The Modern Architecture Genealogy. The development is supported in large part by a faculty grant from Penn State's College of Arts and Architecture.

NOV 2013 Foxman is a panelist on Penn State's Archigram roundtable (in conjunction with the Archigram Exhibit) with Dennis Crompton (Archigram), Michael Webb (Archigram), William Menking (The Architect's Newspaper) and Denise Costanzo (Penn State).

OCT 2013 Foxman presents WAAC's work in her lecture Information Structures and the Leftovers at Penn State's Stuckeman School.

FALL 2013 Foxman teaches ARCH 331 studio at Penn State's Stuckeman School, Department of Architecture, where she is currently Career Development Assistant Professor/Fellow.

FALL 2013 Foxman establishes The Modern Architecture Genealogy research team at Penn State; and receives a faculty grant from Penn State's College of Arts and Architecture to advance the project.

SUMMER 2013 Foxman teaches summer studio at the Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies (NYC).

SUMMER 2013 Foxman is a Visiting Design Critic at Columbia University (NYC).

 

The MODERN Architecture Genealogy, 2007-

Initiated in 2007, The MODERN Architecture Genealogy will be a highly interactive diginal humanites project, which illustrates the evolution of architecture from 1850 to the present. The project is supported in part by a research grant from The Pennsylvania State University's College of Arts and Architecture. An advisory board of global scholars, curators and publishers was established in 2012.

TEAM: Laura Foxman (Project Leader), Richard George, Nenad Katic, Kieran Lynn, Mary Voorhees Meehan, Ryan Niswonger, Rashmi Shukla (Consulted: IBM Visualization Group, Rachel Silberstein, among many others)
PROGRAM: Information Design, Exhibition and Research
TYPOLOGY: Information Architecture, Digital Humanities Project, Big Data, Data Visualization, Interactive Web-based Platform

 

PENCILS & A PEN, 2014-2015

Pencils & A Pen

Pencils & A Pen: A Survey of 1980s Japanese Novelty Pencils Produced During the Emergence of Personal Computing

Pencils & A Pen is a photographic survey of 1980s Japanese novelty pencils and their designs. These pencils, originally distributed through stationery and children’s stores, found popularity at the dawn of personal computing and have come to represent a bygone era of handwriting culture. An introductory essay relates handwriting to notable twentieth-century Japanese aesthetic surveys praising the mysterious beauty of everyday objects that meaningfully connect the user to design culture.

Available online through Publication Studio and at various museums, design shops and bookstores.

AUTHOR:
Laura Foxman
TEAM: Laura Foxman with Neil Donnelly (Graphic Design), Ayumi Giampietro (Japanese Translation), Bethany Ides (Editing), Michael Judge (Photography), Mary Meehan (Cover Design)
PUBLISHER: Publication Studio
TYPOLOGY: Book
DETAILS: English with Japanese translations / 224 pages / Color illustrations / 4.25 x 10.25 / ISBN 978-1-62462-123-9

 

Towards a Global Block System, 2013-2014

Global Blocks Hurricane Sandy Region

Towards a Global Block System

The project conceptualizes the Information House (2012-2014) on a global scale. Research for the project began with explorations of the historical development of mapping the planet. The age of exploration produced maps that allude to measurability and global connectedness through networked waterways and exploration. In contrast, the twentieth century saw a rise in conceptual approaches to global space. Today, advancements in satellite and interactive technologies offer new possibilities in mapping the global community in plain data, but such advances still do not allow us to easily grasp the impact of earth events. We need a new global coordinate system that allows people to navigate and easily understand the significance of particular earth events. The Global Block System would fill this need.

TEAM: Laura Foxman, Mahalia Cohen
PROJECT LOCATION: Rockaway, Queens / Global
TYPOLOGY: Global Coordinate System, Measurement System
DETAILS: Proposal for PS1 MoMA EXPO 1, NY: 2013 / Presented at ACSA Conference, Miami: 2014

 

Information House, 2012-

Info House Plan

Information House

The information house is an experimental house prototype where aesthetics are secondary. The information house is a new series of case study houses, sites.

TEAM: Laura Foxman
CONSULTATION : Claire Maxfield, Atelier Ten
PROJECT LOCATION: United States
TYPOLOGY: Residential, Data System, R&D

 

Busan Opera House, 2011

Busan View

Busan From City

Busan Drawings

Busan Opera House

The curtain as concept and protagonist.

The curtain embodies the illusive and provocative, suggests the spectacular, and opens up into grand and subtle displays of human creativity. Visitors, as well as city dwellers and the harbor community, experience spectacles of surprise and variety. A public park loops the entire building, offering a visual promenade around a curtain of glass, as visitors walk, jog, bike or sail.

The building follows a draping strategy.  A unified and complex vision — roof and facade are one; a single gesture encloses the landmark structure. The grand atrium, the three halls — the 2000-seat opera house, 1300-seat auditorium and 300-seat multipurpose hall — and the public flow, express the curtain effect of revealing and concealing. 


TEAM:
Laura Foxman, Marco Baldassari, Nenad Katic, Mary Voorhees Meehan, and Robert Oringdulph
LOCATION: Busan, Korea
PROGRAM: 1,750,000 SF of Arts Programming and Outdoor Public Space
TYPOLOGY: Cultural and Performing Arts Center (Performance Hallsl, Urban Esplanade with Outdoor Amphitheater, Library/Archive, Art Galleries, Restaurants, Conference Halls, Retail, Offices and Support Programming)

 

Curating Ourselves, 2010-

We-Are-All-Collage

WAAC by RWH

Curating Ourselves

WE ARE ALL COLLAGE invited Mary Voorhees Meehan and RWH STUDIO to particpate in a poster series that expresses collage and WAAC's collaborate practices through their own sensibilities.

Above: An animation shows possible configurations of Mary Voorhees Meehan's We Are All Collage (#1) for WE ARE ALL COLLAGE (WAAC). The poster's quadrant structure, four 8.5" x 11" sheets, celebrates variation and assemblages. Meehan's poster (4 x 1/4 of the poster with quadrants: We, All, Are and Col-lage) is offered for free here.

Below: RWH STUDIO's poster is a meditation, an ouevre complete, philosophical, small, big, medium, huge, a symphony, an undertaking, a parade of forms, a parade of thought, awe-some, B&W, a revelation, process, original typeface. The series can be seen and printed here.


TEAM:
WAAC and Graphic Designers
TYPOLOGY: Poster, Printed Matter and Screen

 

The Listening Archive, 2009-

TLA

The Listening Archive (www.thelisteningarchive.org) offers the public and future generations an evolving portrait of our musical culture and a history that has yet to be documented. This documented form of musical listening, which does not exist anywhere else in popular culture, offers a history of what musical icons, professional musicians, composers, musicologists, sound engineers, scholars and musical enthusiasts think and hear while listening to music - and allows us to experience how they experience music.  

Wouldn't it be wonderful if we knew what Igor Stravinsky listened for in Olivier Messiaen's chamber music, what Henryk Szerying heard in Pedro Infante's songs, what Frank Sinatra thought of Elvis Presley's phrasing? And how about the Beethoven enthusiast who has attended concerts for the last eighty years and has heard classical music performed by some of the twentieth century's greatest performers and conductors - what subtleties does she hear, what does she listen for? What do indie rockers, rap stars, new music composers, young musicians and enthusiasts who have grown up with MP3 players, MTV and playlists listen for, when they hear their favorite recordings? 

The Listening Archive interviews and catalogs oral histories, in-depth commentaries by musical icons, professional musicians, composers, musicologists, sound engineers, scholars and musical enthusiasts discussing recordings of their choosing that are of artistic and personal significance. These oral histories help ensure that our culture's broad musical expertise is not lost, but honored and preserved.

The Listening Archive was established in 2009. The Listening Archive is a multimedia project produced by TheListeningArchive.org, Ajna Film (www.ajnafilm.com) and with filmmakers Alysa Nahmias (Co-Producer) and Alexandra Brodsky (Director of Photography). 


TEAM (Production/Post-production): Laura Foxman, Alysa Nahmias, Alexandra Brodsky, Ryan Cooper, Cathryne Czubek, Nick Rossier, Ruth Somalo, Laura Stella, Keith Sullivan, Monique Yamaguchi, Silver Sound
COLLABORATORS: Ajna Film Production and Interviewees
PARTNERSHIPS: Library of Congress, New York Public Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center
PROGRAM: Nonprofit Arts Organization and Multimedia Project
TYPOLOGY: Multimedia Project (Website, Audio-video Archive, DVDs, Documentary, Webcasts, Radio, etc.)
PROJECT LAUNCH: 2012, ISSUE Project Room (Brooklyn, NY) / Forthcoming Collection: Library of Congress (Washington, D.C.)

 

Still Life Installation, 2009

Still Life Installation View

Still Life Installation View

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Still Life Installation

The installation, a landscape of dialysis fluid-bags, slide projectors and projected image-light, is part of The Still Life Project, an installation series that investigates time, prosthetics and inhabitance. The Worksound installation emerged from a fascination with the prosthetic body, the body of assemblage, and a desire to create an environment bathed in dialysis fluid, a fluid that keeps the body alive. 

(Note: The video clip above shows one view of the installation space in real-time. The installation has six projection fields and a 45-minute projection cycle.)

TEAM: Laura Foxman and Shawn Maximo
CONSULTANTS: James Stallcup (Consultant/Fabricator) and Kodak Technology Specialists
CONSTRUCTION: Laura Foxman and Shawn Maximo
LOCATION: Worksound Gallery, Portland, Oregon
PROGRAM: Installation (32' x 16' x 9')
TYPOLOGY: Installation
MATERIALS: 100 Baxter Peritoneal home dialysis bags with dialysis fluid, 6 Kodak Slide Projectors (Models: Ektagraphic III AT, Carousel 4400, Carousel 5200, Ektagraphic Model B, Ektagraphic III BR and Ektagraphic III E), 2 SP Kodak Programmable Dissolve Controls, 1 SP Dissolve Control, 1 Kodak Slide Timer, slides, projected light and steel cable/suspension hardware

 

WAAC Pamphlet, 2008

Busan From City

We Are All Collage, The Pamphlet

The pamphlet is both a book and a mural; and is designed as as an unfolding, accordion-style pamphlet that operates at multiple scales  — explores visual narratives at multiple scales.

TEAM: WAAC
LOCATION: Available through Printed Matter, Inc. in NYC
TYPOLOGY: Book, Collage

 

Hampton Pipes Restoration, 2005-2006

Pipes

Hampton Pipes Restoration

Planned and designed the interior restoration of a Hampton Pipes’ house (c. 1917). The restoration design celebrates light and lightness, which frame Pipes’ modernist sensibilities.

TEAM: Laura Foxman
CONSTRUCTION: Carpentry, Electrical, Flooring, Geotechnical, HVAC, Lighting, Plaster/Painting and Plumbing
LOCATION: Oregon
PROGRAM: 5000 SF House
TYPOLOGY: Housing (Interiors/Restoration)

 

Excess Tower|s, 2004

Excess 01

Excess 02

Excess Tower|s

The office tower typology is fundamentally related to notions of economy. Towers that have central cores are generally regarded as having the "most efficient" organizations. The proposed office tower offers a conceptual alternative to the efficient office tower by proposing new kinds of spaces, which capitalize on conscious excesses, specifically "ornament." Ornament, which has traditionally been considered tacked-on, superfluous - excessive - can transform a building's overall organization and radicalize typologies.

Office towers have excess built into them, as they are designed to withstand hundred-year storms and other kinds of disasters.  Calculated live and dead loads, for example, incorporate these excessive possibilities, yet they are most often embedded within the architecture. Such excessiveness generally finds expression in more of the same, such as the thickening up of columns and beams, which are often already hidden from view.

Excess Tower|s engages these embedded excesses, which fall under the guise of structure and are inherent in building systems. The project is comprised of six sliver buildings, which contribute to the Tower|s's excessive surface area. Excess Tower|s's elevators follow excessive, diagonal paths. The project's form does not maximize interior space. Quite the opposite, its pseudo-hourglass-shaped slivers are pinched at their centers, where their bending moments would be greatest, requiring increased structure. These excesses, however, produce interesting experiential, programmatic, and structural results. 

The excessive surface area allows for increased full-exposure throughout the Tower. In most conventional office towers, each floor has only four corner offices. In contrast, some of this project's floors have 18. The Tower|s's excessive pinching produces interesting programmatic and formal possibilities. Unlike conventional office towers whose floor plates vary little from floor to floor, the Tower|s can accommodate diverse programs because of its considerable variation. Larger floor plates are used as trading floors or corporate headquarters, while smaller footprints are utilized for small businesses, such as art galleries, law offices, and non-profits with fewer employees. Each business and corporation is guaranteed at least one corner office and great views of the city, which is not possible in most conventional towers.

The excess benefits the structure and its expression. The diagonally arranged elevators act as buttresses, granting the structure strength and stability. The structural skins, patterns of tubular steel, transform the experience of the building, as the building changes from floor to floor. The Tower|s is most opaque at its six pinched centers, and its top floors are the most transparent. The Tower|s's structural skin patterns express the changing forces from floor to floor, by proportionally increasing the number of the steel supports and calibrating their dimensions based on proximity to the pinched centers and distance from the ground.

TEAM: Laura Foxman
LOCATION: New York, NY
PROGRAM: 2.5 million square feet (80,000 SF footprint) of Office, Cultural, Retail and Public Space
TYPOLOGY: High-Rise Office Tower

 

Music Library for a Violinist, 2000-2001

Music Library for a Violinist

Music Library for a Violinist

The music library was designed for a classical violinist. Proportion was the primary design strategy, as many - including the violinist client - consider classical music to be an art of proportions. Every detail - knob, door, shelf and elevation - is related proportionally to the 13" record module.


TEAM:
Laura Foxman
CONSTRUCTION: Kenneth Fender
LOCATION: Portland, Oregon
PROGRAM: 300 SF Library
TYPOLOGY: Library